What Is The Difference Between Plato’S Approach And Aristotle Approach To Imitation?

What did Aristotle and Plato agree on?

Both Plato and Aristotle based their theories on four widely accepted beliefs: Knowledge must be of what is real.

The world experienced via the senses is what is real.

Knowledge must be of what is fixed and unchanging..

What is Plato’s theory of imitation?

In the Republic, Plato says that art imitates the objects and events of ordinary life. In other words, a work of art is a copy of a copy of a Form. It is even more of an illusion than is ordinary experience. On this theory, works of art are at best entertainment, and at worst a dangerous delusion.

What are the three modes of imitation as suggested by Aristotle?

The remainder of Book I is devoted to a discussion of the different media of imitation; Book II treats the objects of imitation and Book III discusses the mode of imitation. The three basic media which Aristotle recognizes are rhythm, language, and harmony.

What are the main ideas of Aristotle?

Aristotle’s philosophy stresses biology, instead of mathematics like Plato. He believed the world was made up of individuals (substances) occurring in fixed natural kinds (species). Each individual has built-in patterns of development, which help it grow toward becoming a fully developed individual of its kind.

What model did Aristotle believe in?

geocentric modelThe model created by Aristotle was a part of multiple examples described as the geocentric model. His model had a total of 55 objects in his idea of the universe.

How did Aristotle defend imitation and poetry?

Aristotle proclaimed that the poet imitates “the ideal reality,” not the mere shadow of things. Thus, the poet does not copy the external world. He creates something new according to his own “idea” of it. … He provided a strong defense of poetry by blowing off Plato’s theory of Poetic Imitation.

What did Aristotle and Plato disagree on?

Aristotle rejected Plato’s theory of Forms but not the notion of form itself. For Aristotle, forms do not exist independently of things—every form is the form of some thing.

Who is better Plato or Aristotle?

Plato by far has contributed more to society than Aristotle. … Aristotle was not read by his contemporaries, but rather the words of Socrates were highly sought after and paid for. Socrates was the father of logic and philosophy (love of wisdom). Plato was his apt student and Aristotle did not learn well from either.

How does Aristotle employ imitation as an aesthetic term?

Aristotle gives an aesthetic meaning to the term ‘imitation’. … Through imitation poet represents life either through action or character or emotion or through objects. According to Aristotle Poetry includes epic poetry, tragedy, comedy, dithyrambic poetry, and music (specifically of flute, and lyre).

What is an example of imitation?

Imitation is defined as the act of copying, or a fake or copy of something. An example of imitation is creating a room to look just like a room pictured in a decorator magazine. An example of imitation is fish pieces sold as crab.

What kind of thing is most real for Aristotle contrast with Plato?

What kind of thing is most real for Aristotle? Contrast with Plato. Primary substance are the most real thing for Aristotle because they are subjects to everything else and all other things are either asserted of them or are present in them.

What are the main differences between Plato and Aristotle?

Plato believed that concepts had a universal form, an ideal form, which leads to his idealistic philosophy. Aristotle believed that universal forms were not necessarily attached to each object or concept, and that each instance of an object or a concept had to be analyzed on its own.

What was Plato’s view on imitation and poetry?

The poet, for Plato, imitates this transitory world and thus his work is only a representation of what is itself an inadequate and an ephemeral representation of the truly real, absolute or eternal. Poetry, therefore, is an imitation of an imitation that is twice removed from reality.

What did Plato say about Homer?

Plato agrees that Homer is indeed the educator of Greece, and immediately adds that Homer is “the most poetic and first of the tragic poets.” Plato is setting himself against what he takes to be the entire outlook—in contemporary but not Plato’s parlance, the entire “philosophy of life”—he believes Homer and his …

Who gave the theory of imitation?

Charles BatteuxThe imitation theory has known his heyday in the eighteenth century, thanks to the French author Charles Batteux. In his The Fine Arts Reduced to a Single Principle, published in 1747, he was the first to classify the “fine arts” on one and the same principle, namely imitation.

What are the 4 causes Aristotle?

Formal Cause – the defining characteristics of (e.g., shape) the thing. … Final Cause – the purpose of the thing. Efficient Cause – the antecedent condition that brought the thing about.

What is the philosophy of Aristotle?

In his natural philosophy, Aristotle combines logic with observation to make general, causal claims. For example, in his biology, Aristotle uses the concept of species to make empirical claims about the functions and behavior of individual animals.

What does Socrates say about poetry?

As a result of the imitative nature of poetry Socrates views the influence of poetry as pernicious as it teaches people to value the wrong things and encourages poor dispositions and character.

What are the three types of imitation?

of imitation. These, then, as we said at the beginning, are the three differences which distinguish artistic imitation- the medium, the objects, and the manner.

What is imitation according to Aristotle?

▪ Imitation, according to Plato, is a mere. copy of life. It is a copy of copy. ▪ Aristotle says that imitation is not a mere. photostat copy of life or the world, but it is a recreated ideal copy of the world.

What are the six elements of Aristotle’s Poetics?

In Poetics, he wrote that drama (specifically tragedy) has to include 6 elements: plot, character, thought, diction, music, and spectacle.