Question: What Words Do British Use?

What does Bob’s your uncle mean?

“Bob’s your uncle” is a phrase commonly used in Ireland, the United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries that means “and there it is” or “and there you have it”.

Typically, someone says it to conclude a set of simple instructions or when a result is reached..

What is a nap called in England?

A British people use kip to mean either a nap or a longer sleep; it can also mean the idea or act of sleeping, as in “Will you be quiet? I’m trying to get some kip in here!” It can also be a verb: “They kipped down for the night”.

What are slang words for 2020?

A Parent’s Guide to the Latest Teen SlangExtra. This is another way of saying that someone or something is too much or over the top. … Snatched. You don’t have to worry if you hear your teen saying that someone or something is snatched. … Big yikes. To use a slang word that we’ve already learned, big yikes is like yikes only extra. … Finsta. … Flex. … No cap. … Lowkey. … Highkey.More items…•

How do you say OK in British slang?

‘Hunky-dory’ – a neat little piece of British slang that means that a situation is okay, cool, or normal. For example, ‘Yeah, everything’s hunky-dory at the office. ‘

What does the idiom cut the mustard mean?

To cut the mustard is “to reach or surpass the desired standard or performance” or more generally “to succeed, to have the ability to do something.” For instance, Beyoncé really cut the mustard in her new song.

What does get down to brass tacks mean?

: details of immediate practical importance —usually used in the phrase get down to brass tacks.

What does geeza mean in British slang?

Alright, you geezaIn the UK, geeza (geezer) is slang, and a jokey way to call someone. It can be friendly or insulting, depending on the context. ” Alright, you geeza.”

What is a ponce in British slang?

British. : pimp also, disparaging + offensive : a male homosexual. Ponce.

What are some British slang words?

50 Must-Know British Slang Words and PhrasesBloke. “Bloke” would be the American English equivalent of “dude.” It means a “man.”Lad. In the same vein as “bloke,” “lad” is used, however, for boys and younger men.Bonkers. … Daft. … To leg it. … Trollied / Plastered. … Quid. … Dodgy.More items…•

What is the most British thing to say?

11 Bloody Brilliant British English Phrases“Fancy a cuppa?” meaning: “Would you like a cup of tea?” … “Alright?” meaning: “Hey, how are you?” … “I’m knackered!” meaning: “I’m tired.” … Cheeky. meaning: playful; mischievous. … “I’m chuffed to bits!” meaning “I’m very pleased.” … Bloody. meaning: very. … To bodge something. … “I’m pissed.”More items…

Is Prat a bad word?

According to Oxford Dictionaries, we started using “prat” to mean idiot in 1960, but before that, it was a 16th century word for buttocks. So when you call someone a prat, you’re also calling them an arse.

Why do British say bloody?

Bloody is a commonly used expletive attributive (intensifier) in British English. It was used as an intensive since at least the 1670s. Considered “respectable” until about 1750, it was heavily tabooed during c. 1750–1920, considered equivalent to heavily obscene or profane speech.

What does cheeky mean in England?

English Language Learners Definition of cheeky chiefly British, informal : rude and showing a lack of respect often in a way that seems playful or amusing. See the full definition for cheeky in the English Language Learners Dictionary. cheeky. adjective.

What does geezer mean in UK?

Geezer is a slang term for a man. In the UK it is used most often to refer simply to a man ie “some geezer was here earlier” and less often as complimentary phrase ie “he is a proper geezer”.

What does Fanny’s your aunt mean?

This expression was first coined in 1887. … A phrase with the same meaning is ‘Fanny’s your aunt’. When used together it means complete or the whole lot. If Bob’s your uncle and Fanny’s your aunt you’ve got a full set of relatives and you are complete.

What is UK English called?

British English is the standard dialect of the English language as spoken and written in the United Kingdom. Variations exist in formal, written English in the United Kingdom.